Playwrights

RSVP for RUTH – November 12, 2018 – Feature by Christy Smith-Sloman

Our 1st feature in November is “Ruth” by Christy Smith-Sloman, directed by Cezar Williams and produced by Daryl Sledge. ABOUT THE PLAY: A New Orleans family gathers on Easter Weekend for an overdue reunion. When family secrets and future plans are revealed, lives are changed forever.

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Meet October’s FEATURE: Lori Minor and RSVP for her Feature : Friday, October 19, 2018 7:30pm

RSVP for our October Feature in The Mary Rodgers Room @ The Dramatists Guild! LORI MINOR is October’s Feature Playwright with “The Coping Mechanism” – Catherine and Paul Harrison decided to support their daughter’s way of coping after a tragic accident, by keeping the spirit of her brother “alive” in their home through her imagination.  However, over time, they’ve begun to realize that the choice isn’t helping them to move forward and may be hurting, more than healing their wounds.

“UNBREAKABLE SOLDIER” November 2016 Feature by Shashone Lambert

Minutes turn into hours, hours into days, days into weeks, and weeks into…TRAGEDY. Unbreakable Soldier was inspired by the tragic story of Kalief Browder; a hero in his own right. It encompasses fictional encounters of Kalief, in real circumstances from his past up until his heartbreaking death, while daringly and un-apologetically bringing light to the mental, emotional and physical effects of being subjected to solitary confinement as a youth as well as the unjust justice system. Unbreakable Soldier…Not even death will stop his purpose.

#blackstoriesmatter: Lekethia Dalcoe and Slope No.12

About the play

It’s 1932 in Birmingham, Alabama at the Pratt Coal mining prison, Slope No. 12. Cheeks and Odin Dean are prisoners and Ezekiel finds bones. Maybell and Vivie Eillien are prostitutes, and Green Cottenham’s spirit comes calling. In the American South, there had to be a system created to control the newly freed black population and convict labor became that solution. This here be the Pratt Coal mines, where black men are picked up for any minimum charge like spitting, talking loud in the presence of a white woman, gambling, or just “being”. In 1932, black prison labor is free, hard, and easy. They are simply slaves given a different name.